Fotos / Sonidos

Qué

Margaritas, Manzanillas, Girasoles Y Parientes (Subfamilia Asteroideae)

Autor

debm

Fecha

Marzo 2, 2024 a las 11:25 AM CST

Descripción

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Agosto 6, 2023 a las 11:38 AM PDT

Descripción

iNaturalist doesn’t have an easy way to log things like this, being bound to one species at a time, but this is a photo of what I think is an Oxytropis parryi X borealis hybrid. The plant in the lower right is Oxytropis parryi, the plant in the upper left is Oxytropis borealis, and in the center between the two is an individual with intermediate traits. These include fewer silky grey hairs than parryi, but without the full sticky/glandular lead hairs of borealis. The size and habit is intermediate, and it has the inflorescences similar to borealis, rather than the solitary flowers of parryi. It even has erect hairs on the pedicel like borealis. More photos available for those interested. So fun!!

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

arbonius

Fecha

Mayo 19, 2023 a las 11:12 AM PDT

Descripción

[[NOTE: Three additional (large-sized!) images of this plant (showing more of the flowering stems, and habitus) are available in this companion post on CalPhotos. Check out the "full-size" photos there.

Also, remarks on diagnostic characters (and some descriptive morphology) for Nemacladus morefieldii appear under the this CalPhotos post. ]]

====== Variation in Characters for Nemacladus morefieldii ======

I'm struck by some of the variation in this (lovely) species.

1) Marginal "chevron" markings on upper three corolla lobes: For instance, note how narrow the reddish "chevrons" of the three upper corolla lobes are in the flowers of the plant here...vs. the much wider marginal chevrons in my CalPhotos post referenced above. Similar variation will be seen upon perusing photos of N. morefieldii on iNaturalist, CalPhotos, and CalFlora.

2) Relative sizes of "flanking" and "central" sepals: Another character that is celebrated for "good" N. morefieldii (i.e. in plants that have taken time to read & comply with the circumscription ;;-) is that the "flanking sepals" (= lateral sepals behind, and angled somewhat below, the lateral petals of the upper lip) are appreciable larger than the "central (upper) sepals" (= those alternating with the uppermost corolla lobe, and positioned behind its sinuses). Not only are those flanking sepals typically somewhat longer and (especially) wider than the upper sepals...but usually they're also distinctly more "cupped", and cradle the lateral lobes of the upper corolla lip — i.e. more so than the flanking sepals in flowers of the close congener N. orientalis (which, in addition, has its sepal of more equal size). It's best to have a "from the back" view of a flower to assess the relative sizes of the flanking & central sepals...which I didn't get here. But, in the first photo here, one can see that the flanking sepals in the withering flower at left-center are somewhat wider & longer than its central sepals. This is a nice distinctive character...though it does seem to vary quite a bit.

3) Relative size (or even absence?) of "rod-like processes": Finally, I've been wondering how much variation in size (and perhaps even presence?) occurs for the glistening, translucent, "rod-like processes" at the bases of the two adaxial stamens. In the flowers imaged here I can clearly discern the presence of these rods...whereas in my CalPhotos post here they aren't discernible. I know from experience that getting a photo with those rod-like processes in focus can be very difficult...since in most Nemacladus species these rods are exceedingly tiny, and there's very little "depth-of-field leeway" for one's focal plane at the high-magnification required to image them. But still, I'd think that even if focus is a bit off, there'd be at least a blurry intimation (or ghost-image) of the rods? But maybe not? At any rate, perusing photos of N. morefieldii, it seems like in some flowers the rods appear distinctly present, while in others they appear to be absent. It may be worth checking fresh flowers seen in the field with a hand-lens...to see if they have a fairly consistent presence & size for these rods (i.e. if their seemingly random "presence" and "absence" in photos is truly just an artifact of getting photographic focus just right).

I suppose whether the rods are visible might also be subject to phenology? How long does it take for a Nemacladus flower to fully-develop...to open and unfurl its corolla lobes, for its staminal tube to attain full length and standard position? Do the rods attain full size in bud, or perhaps continue to grow a bit after the flower opens and as it matures...passing from its "male" anther-dehiscing stage through to its "female" stage of stigma receptivity? And how many days does a given flower remain open during this process? One, two, more?

There are always more questions to ponder with these wonderful plants :-)

====== Pollination Biology in Nemacladus ======

I'm especially curious & eager for us to learn more about which groups of insects are effective pollinators of Nemacladus flowers...and details of the pollination processes that occur & their mechanisms (e.g. Campanulaceae is known for its remarkable secondary pollen presentation structures & mechanisms).

For instance, I'd speculate that species with non-resupinate flowers like N. morefieldii (and N. orientalis, N. montanus, N. interior, etc.) would tend to place pollen on the underside of a visiting insect of the appropriate size (i.e. sternotribic pollen placement). And for resupinate-flowered species, I'd guess pollen placement would more likely be on the upperside of an insect visitor's body (i.e. nototribic). But a priori speculation about pollination processes based on flower morphology has often turned out to be off-the-mark. ;-) Careful direct observation & documention of pollinator visits and behavior (and thoughtful, creative experimentation)...though very time-consuming and laborious...is probably the best avenue for making progress on this front.

I also wonder to what extent (and under what conditions) self-pollination may occur in Nemacladus?

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

joergmlpts

Fecha

Abril 20, 2023 a las 01:23 PM PDT

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Autor

matt_g

Fecha

Abril 2023

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Qué

Abrojo (Xanthium strumarium)

Autor

matsonburger

Fecha

Mayo 21, 2019 a las 12:28 PM PDT

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Qué

Saguaro (Carnegiea gigantea)

Fecha

Mayo 30, 2022 a las 12:18 PM MST

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Qué

Huizapol (Distichlis spicata)

Autor

cabbagefreak

Fecha

Junio 12, 2022 a las 06:09 PM PDT

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

flaveboy

Fecha

Octubre 30, 2022 a las 10:36 AM PDT

Descripción

3 of these growing on kelso dunes - see my other observations

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Autor

hkibak

Fecha

Noviembre 1, 2022 a las 03:12 PM PDT

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Autor

mdpurdy

Fecha

Julio 2021

Descripción

Associated with (from same population as) collection Purdy 1141.

Population size estimated at ca. 40 plants. Most vegetative, none in flower, and only 3 in fruit.

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Autor

matsonburger

Fecha

Junio 2022

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Autor

wildgifts

Fecha

Junio 18, 2022 a las 12:25 PM PDT

Descripción

Collection #1265

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Autor

joeysantore

Fecha

Mayo 11, 2022 a las 06:23 PM CAT

Descripción

The only other plant found growing in the immediate vicinity was a succulent shrub species of Amaranthaceae, Arthraerua leubnitziae. Heavy fog in the morning. Ten miles East, no fog. In this way Welwitschia can be seen to be a relictual species somewhat akin to coastal redwoods of California, both clinging to a narrow strip along the coast of a cold ocean where they can find what they need to survive and in the case of Welwitschia, avoid competition.

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Autor

evolvulux

Fecha

Mayo 22, 2021 a las 12:36 PM MDT

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Autor

wildgifts

Fecha

Julio 22, 2021 a las 10:00 AM PDT

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Autor

walterfertig

Fecha

Junio 2014

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Autor

madge

Fecha

Abril 10, 2021 a las 11:54 AM PDT

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Autor

jrebman

Fecha

Abril 10, 2021 a las 12:08 PM PDT

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Fecha

Abril 8, 2021 a las 09:09 AM PDT

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Autor

swinitsky

Fecha

Mayo 2019

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Qué

Hierba Limpia (Logfia depressa)

Autor

efmer

Fecha

Marzo 3, 2019 a las 10:02 AM PST

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Qué

Pino Longevo (Pinus longaeva)

Fecha

Agosto 18, 2020 a las 03:11 PM PDT

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Autor

matsonburger

Fecha

Mayo 2, 2019 a las 10:44 AM PDT

Lugar

Lead gulch (Google, OSM)

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

gentilcore

Fecha

Abril 2018

Descripción

USA, Nevada, Clark County, Gold Butte National Monumnet: The spectacular yellow Las Vegas Bearpaw Poppy flowers blooming on barren gypsum hills near Little Finland.

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

micahlauer

Fecha

Junio 7, 2019 a las 09:53 AM MDT

Descripción

Growing out of the very top of Delicate Arch... A sea of tourists taking selfies under the most well-known arch in the U.S. and of course I'm drawn to the native plant it's wearing as a hat. ha ha.

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

ob1963

Fecha

Noviembre 24, 2013 a las 03:10 PM PST

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Fecha

Mayo 22, 2020 a las 12:04 PM PDT

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Autor

kerinnag

Fecha

Mayo 13, 2020 a las 10:39 AM MST

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Mayo 2020

Descripción

I almost can’t believe it myself, but it has to be this. We just went and saw Lewisia maguirei in the Quinn Canyon Range YESTERDAY. About 150 air miles from this location in the Spring Mountains. About 50 plants. South and west facing limestone slope near top of small ridge. We looked at the sepals of 20 flowers, 19 had 3 sepals and 1 had 4 sepals. Plants had 2-3 flowers per inflorescence. :)!

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

coreyk

Fecha

Abril 15, 2011 a las 02:53 PM PDT

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Qué

Hierba de Conejo de Guadalupe (Ericameria nauseosa)

Fecha

Octubre 31, 2019 a las 03:37 PM PDT

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Fecha

Abril 19, 2020 a las 08:20 AM PDT

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Autor

lonnyholmes

Fecha

Abril 11, 2020 a las 12:38 PM PDT

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Qué

Cabellos de Ángel (Género Cuscuta)

Fecha

Marzo 28, 2020 a las 03:50 PM PDT

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Qué

Pica Americana (Ochotona princeps)

Fecha

Agosto 13, 2015 a las 03:10 PM HST

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Qué

Piñón de Una Hoja (Pinus monophylla)

Autor

ekoberle

Fecha

Diciembre 28, 2019 a las 07:58 AM PST

Descripción

Two separate cones near each other in wash adjacent to Mesquite Spring Campground. Must've traveled quite a great distance to get to this point.

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Qué

Arroz Indio (Eriocoma hymenoides)

Autor

rhjackso

Fecha

Enero 2, 2020 a las 08:34 AM PST

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Qué

Gobernadora (Larrea tridentata)

Autor

rhjackso

Fecha

Enero 2, 2020 a las 11:12 AM PST

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Autor

naomibot

Fecha

Septiembre 23, 2018 a las 12:45 PM PDT

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Qué

Papamoscas Fibí (Sayornis phoebe)

Autor

sheliahargis

Fecha

Octubre 21, 2017 a las 10:55 AM CDT

Descripción

Not sure what is going on but this is the fourth birder that I know of who has had a phoebe perch on their binoculars or on their person at Commons Ford.

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Autor

coreyjlange

Fecha

Abril 22, 2019 a las 03:52 PM PDT

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Autor

micrathene

Fecha

Febrero 18, 2019 a las 02:42 PM MST

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Qué

Llareta (Azorella compacta)

Fecha

Octubre 11, 2009

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Autor

walterfertig

Fecha

Junio 2011

Descripción

Yermo xanthocephalus in flower (note the yellow phyllaries)

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Autor

storm_petrel

Fecha

Septiembre 15, 2017 a las 03:46 PM PDT

Descripción

Pink family? one of the few hardy plants that grow on the Negit islets

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Qué

Hierba Mansa (Anemopsis californica)

Autor

yaelorgad

Fecha

Mayo 18, 2018 a las 05:41 PM IDT

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Autor

buzzard

Fecha

Marzo 2016

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Autor

glmory

Fecha

Julio 31, 2017 a las 02:13 PM PDT

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Qué

Humano (Homo sapiens)

Autor

robberfly

Fecha

Julio 25, 2018 a las 12:45 PM PDT

Descripción

iNaturalists gather at 10,000 ft. to count Butterflies on White Mountain. l to r: @sea-kangaroo @maractwin @catchang @robberfly @leptonia @storm_petral

Fotos / Sonidos

Fecha

Mayo 29, 2016 a las 11:33 AM MDT

Descripción

These were blooming all over the area above the Dominguez Canyon, bright spots of yellow opening for one day and then dying, ready for another set to bloom tomorrow. They don't have time for fancy smooth petals, so the wrinkled linen look is in.

A beetle resting in the shade of some petals is par for the course!

Fotos / Sonidos

Autor

lonnyholmes

Fecha

Mayo 1, 2018 a las 12:25 PM PDT

Descripción

ambiguus or thurberi?